Learn More About Shingle Roof



PROJECT BASICS PRICES & COSTS POPULAR MATERIALS ROOFING STYLES

Shingle Roofs

Shingle roofs are the most popular roofing choice in the United States due to their affordable price, overall strength, longevity and performance. Learn the basics, costs and many different shingle options that exist today.


Shingle Roof Basics

When someone mentions a shingle roof, they are probably talking about the asphalt shingles. Shingles are available in a host of other materials including composite materials, but the majority of these roofing materials are made from asphalt. The material used in the shingles impacts the overall durability and quality of this roofing choice.


Shingle Roof Prices

Entry to Middle Range - $2 to $2.50 per square foot installed. Choosing this type of shingle will cost around $175 - $250 per square installed.

Middle to Higher Range - $2.50 to $5 per square foot installed. This type of shingle can cost between $250 and $325 per square installed.


Shingle Roof Types


Composite Shingle

Composite shingles are similar to the asphalt shingles, which still remain the more popular of the two. Composite shingles use an organic and fiberglass core with an asphalt coating. The shingles are coated with granules making the roof sun and fire resistant while adding to the durability of the shingle.


Organic Shingle

Organic shingles are usually made of paper or wood. This is made to a felt like material. Over the years this type of shingle has evolved. Originally it was a common choice, but today there are so many other materials which are far superior when it comes to quality. These shingles weren't very durable and didn't have a very long life span, especially when faced with high temperatures and moisture. Today the organic shingles are used in dry and cold areas.


Fiberglass Shingles

Fiberglass shingles are also a common shingle choice because the fiberglass core is able to resist moisture. These are light shingles, making them very easy when it comes to installation.


Wood Shingles

Wood is a choice for those who don't want to go with the popular asphalt shingles. Wood shingles are often made using cedar; each shingle is unique because of the wood grain, which makes this such a popular choice. When it comes to price, wood is more expensive than the asphalt options, but when it comes to life span, they are on a par with each other.


Shingle Roof Styles


Strip Shingles

Strip shingles are the most popular choice when it comes to asphalt shingles. These are also called three tab shingles, which means that they have three tabs, making it an easy installation process. These shingles come in a host of pattern and design options to complement the property.


Laminate Shingles

Laminate shingles are three dimensional in shape and are very distinct in style. Many people refer to the laminate shingle roof as architectural shingles. While they are expensive when compared to some of the other shingles on the market, they are easy when it comes to installation and offer a beautiful finish to a property.


Interlocking Shingles

The interlocking shingles are the perfect choice for areas where they experience high winds. These shingles lock together, making them durable in high wind situations.


Individual Shingles

Individual shingles are single shingles which offer versatility and flexibility when it comes to installation. The individual shingles come in a host of different pattern designs and shapes, enabling homeowners to create their own roof design.


Choosing the Right Shingles


Climate

Climate plays a very important role when choosing shingles. There are so many different choices available. Zinc and copper are idea in areas which are wet and moist, as these materials are fungus and algae resistant. Interlocking shingles are good in high wind areas. So it's always advisable to determine which shingles will best meet the climatic conditions of the specific area before making any final decisions.


Building Codes

Some areas restrict the type of shingles allowed. Roofing contractors in specific areas usually have a good understanding of the requirements in specific areas and will be able to advise what shingles are or are not allowed.


Pitch

The slope of the roof also plays an important role in the shingle roof decision. Some shingles are better on lower pitched roofs, while others work well with any pitch.